What we once knew as the standard office has come and gone. People everywhere, in all markets and industries, are radically rejecting the typical corporate office. In its place are spaces that feel like home – inspiring, authentic and not so buttoned up. These meaningful spaces project a different brand and less corporate feel, are emotionally comfortable and thoughtfully curated so people can focus alone or work creatively together. It’s a new day and a new work order.

What this means to us is, the way we work is significantly shifting; we’re experiencing an office renaissance if you will. People no longer want what they define as ‘corporate,’ but as something fundamentally different. They want a place that drives work forward but that looks like The New Office.

In response, we’re seeing this rise of the “ancillary” aesthetic with a strong emphasis on choice and control through more residential or hospitality-like products and accessories.

More and more, our clients are requiring bold colors, unique textures and fun materials to reign supreme. They are saying that look and feel are equally as important as performance. We couldn’t agree more.

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The New Office is driven by 4 major disruptors:

  1. Culture: Culture is expressing itself in new ways in the office – from the integration of nature and the personalization of design, to a worker’s ability to express authenticity at a job that provides them a sense of purpose.
  2. Employee engagement: The most engaged employees create new ideas and generate more profits. Workers who are highly satisfied are also more engaged, yet, disengaged employees make up about one-third of the average workforce.
  3. Technology: An increasing range of devices and the growing adoption of the Internet of Things, virtual reality and artificial intelligence are not only changing the ways people work and the work they’re doing, it’s changing what is expected of the workplace.
  4. Creative work: We face global issues that require all of us to unleash our creative potential to solve problems, make new connections and generate ideas. This is a central shift we’re seeing and responding to today.

The New Office:

  • Offers personalized style and aesthetic range
  • Signals a unique kind of openness, making use of every square inch
  • Supports free address workers and alternative work styles
  • Allows flexibility and user control
  • Is inspiring for all types of tasks and durations
  • Is the perfect home base for creativity and innovation

OpenSquare is your resource
We are experts in furniture, architecture and technology. We know how integrating these elements significantly impacts productivity, employee engagement and the need to be creative at work. We are design thinkers, well-versed in the implications the New Office has on workers, work and business.

In fact, we’re actively helping customers be successful today and tomorrow by designing:

  1. Spaces grounded in nature to help people thrive. Today, designers are turning toward the biophilia principle, which recognizes that human beings have an innate desire to connect and bond with nature.
  2. Environments that allow for more personal touches and that activate people’s senses with a wide range of textures, patterns and colors.
  3. Areas that stress a new level of comfort for working and collaborating.
  4. Destinations where technology is integrated in the walls, floors and furniture to actually make the work experience more convenient and human centered.
  5. More open spaces where people can move, shift postures and put their feet up.

The trend toward more creative work is here, and workspaces need to move forward too. We know you want every investment to count. We’re here to help you, and bring value at scale.

Resources
To learn more, please connect with us today at 206.768.8000. See what’s possible by scheduling a showroom visit. And, for a deep dive into the emphasis on creativity in the workplace, read the newest issue of Steelcase 360 Magazine.